All posts tagged: Historical living blog

A Look Back at My Favorite Posts

Well, I am, and have been, in early labor for days.   Not enough to be admitted into the hospital, but enough where I am definitely feeling uncomfortable!  To cheer myself up and stay focused, I have had a wonderful afternoon looking though my vintage cookbooks, watching old movies, and planning new sewing projects…although I know that latter is very optimistic! 🙂 So in the spirit of looking through some oldies but goodies, I thought I would share some of my favorite blog posts from the past few years.  If they are new to you, I hope you enjoy them, and if they have been ones you have seen before, maybe some little part of them will re-inspire you! Click on each title above the image to be taken to each specific post! My Top Ten Vacation Themed Musicals Visiting Your Local Farmer’s Market Give Yourself a Manicure: 1940’s Style Intro to Sewing Video Series: Paper Patterns Inspiration Board: Traveling Outfits Fingers crossed I go into labor soon!!! 😉

1940’s Blouse Pattern and Tutorial

This blouse is such a quick and easy way to take an extra yard of fabric and turn it into something special!  Add some pizzaz with different fabrics, contrasting colors, and trims!!  The possibilities are endless! What you will need:   1 yard of fabric* 12″ of 1/2″ wide elastic Thread * To create a larger size, simply create a larger square – 40″ x 40″, 42″ x 42″, etc This pattern can be created by simply measuring and cutting the actual fabric, however the pictures below are shown on a large piece of craft paper.   The Process Fold a 36″ by 36″ piece of fabric (or paper) into a triangle. Mark the neck between the two end points. Measure 13-15″ from center of neck towards one point.  Mark this point.  The length will be the sleeve, so make it as long or as short as you would like.  Then cut off the triangle.  Repeat with the other side. Allow 8-10″ for armhole then stitch (right sides together) 4-5″ down from this point.  This line …

Historical Patterns I’m Excited to Try!

I think I have drained my current pool of patterns.  I mean, I love many of them and will always use them…but, I’m am definitely feeling a little bored.   Especially with my due date coming closer and closer, I am trying to stay occupied with sewing…it’s sort of working! 🙂 So yesterday, with the warm sun on my face, I spent a little time looking up some new and different patterns to try.  Here are a few of my favorites!!!   Links to the patterns are below each image! I love the unique and various caps in this particular pattern.  Especially the Round Eared Cap with double ruffle!! 1740-1820 Women and Girls Caps from Amazon Dry Goods I am sure anyone wearing this amazingly beautiful, pleated mantle would feel elegant and very summery!  The only thing I’m not sure of is what fabric I would use….. 1863 Summer Mantle from Amazon Dry Goods With a yardage requirement of 16 yards, this gown would definitely be a commitment, but I love all the ruffles and …

On My Inspiration Board: Patterned Gowns

I decided to bring back an old post favorite which I haven’t done in a while: On My Inspiration Board!  For this post, I choose either a color, pattern, shape, or type of gown and collect my favorites to share from the years 1800-1950.  For today’s version, I decided to choose gowns made out a of patterned fabric.  Whether geometric, floral, or striped, these gowns are wonderful examples of fabric design and gown creation! In my daily wardrobe, I don’t really wear a whole lot of patterns.  Yet when it comes to my sewing, I adore using patterns.  Any type of pattern using any type of colors.  I simply love it.  And based on all my research, I am not alone!  From morning gowns, to tea gowns, to evening gowns, patterns have been a favorite for decades. This particular painting shows how embroidery create a lovely pattern on this elegant 1810’s court dress.  Perhaps not a gown to be worn by the average woman, bust still stunning! Duchess Talleyrand-Périgord, Princess Dorothea by Joseph Chabord This gown …

My May Favorites

Summer is almost here!!  How do I know?  Well, apart from the increased sound of lawn mowers up and down the neighborhood, I can now leave the house without a jacket!  A wonderful change if you ask me!! And since it is almost summer, and a new month, it is time to share with you my favorite list of things I am loving or wishing to try! All links are below each image. To start this month’s favorites list off, I have chosen the sweetest little romper. With my own little girl due next month, I am all about sweet, simple clothes to dress her in!! 🙂 Bailey Blossoms – Blueberry Pie Romper Not only am I in love with the soft green of this gown, I am also on a 1890’s kick!  I love the 1700’s influence seen in the back fabric drape. 1890’s Tea Gown from the John Bright Collection Even though I am still rocking maternity clothes, I thought this jacket from Modcloth would still be a wonderful addition to both my maternity …

A Tribute to the Gibson Girl

With her wasp-waist, highly piled hair, perfectly pressed shirtwaist, and look of complete confidence, the Gibson Girl of the early 1900’s was truly a fashion icon.  So much so that she still inspires fashion today from lace details to loosely curled hair.  Named after the artist who made the look famous, the Gibson Girl is as much an ideal as she was a real person.  Therefore today’s post is all about the Gibson Girl and ways to channel her into your historical fashion wardrobe! 🙂 Links to featured items are in bold and below each image. Let’s begin with the most famous Gibson Girl of all – Camille Clifford.  She was the European actress who won the Gibson Girl contest, and its not hard to see why! Camille Clifford – The winner of the Gibson Girl Contest.  Learn more about her and see many lovely images by visiting the National Portrait Gallery. Every proper Gibson Girl needs the proper shoe!  And these lovelies from the American Duchess are perfect! “Gibson” Edwardian Shoes from American Duchess The perfectly tailored …

Historical Fashion Shoot at The Buffalo Niagara Heritage Village

Last Saturday, I had the extreme privilege of being allowed special access to photograph my gowns in and around the historic buildings belonging to the Buffalo Niagara Heritage Village.    This museum not only features many wonderful exhibits for both young and old, but they also have twelve historical buildings that have been painstakingly and lovingly returned to historical accuracy.  A truly wonderful place for the whole family where you can take a step back in time! Here are a few outside pictures of the buildings apart of this wonderful village! Aren’t they stunning!?  Sigh…. Anyways!  This past Saturday, I loaded up a a variety of gowns, two great friends, and spent a fabulous afternoon enjoying the warm sunshine and all things historical!! Enjoy!!   A big thank you to Buffalo Niagara Heritage Village for opening up their doors!  We all had a great time and I think the buildings did too! 🙂   Many of these gowns are available for purchase on my Etsy Shop!   Have you joined my Facebook Group Inside Aimee’s Armoire?  Join now to connect …

A Fashion Excerpt from Good Housekeeping, 1922

I love fashion spreads in magazines. I love seeing the looks, colors, styles, and accessories that are currently (or have been) in trend…no matter what the decade.  And today’s spread is no exception! Another thing that I absolutely adore about these early women’s magazines are how varied and detailed the topics are compared to today’s.  You especially get that vibe when you read the descriptions of each outfit and accessory.  It isn’t simply a list of the maker and price.  Instead it is a lovely little blurb highlighting the main points of each item along with a wonderful description of color.   I hope you enjoy taking a little look back at not only fashion from the 1920’s, but also into the setup and work that went in to creating these wonderful magazine pieces! 🙂 Fashions Edited by Helen Kous Good Housekeeping, April, 1922 Volume 74, Number 4 Have you joined my new Facebook Group Inside Aimee’s Armoire?????   No???   Well hop on over and join now!   It’s all about sharing love and support for projects revolving …