All posts filed under: My Sewing

1940’s Blouse Pattern and Tutorial

This blouse is such a quick and easy way to take an extra yard of fabric and turn it into something special!  Add some pizzaz with different fabrics, contrasting colors, and trims!!  The possibilities are endless! What you will need:   1 yard of fabric* 12″ of 1/2″ wide elastic Thread * To create a larger size, simply create a larger square – 40″ x 40″, 42″ x 42″, etc This pattern can be created by simply measuring and cutting the actual fabric, however the pictures below are shown on a large piece of craft paper.   The Process Fold a 36″ by 36″ piece of fabric (or paper) into a triangle. Mark the neck between the two end points. Measure 13-15″ from center of neck towards one point.  Mark this point.  The length will be the sleeve, so make it as long or as short as you would like.  Then cut off the triangle.  Repeat with the other side. Allow 8-10″ for armhole then stitch (right sides together) 4-5″ down from this point.  This line …

Historical Patterns I’m Excited to Try!

I think I have drained my current pool of patterns.  I mean, I love many of them and will always use them…but, I’m am definitely feeling a little bored.   Especially with my due date coming closer and closer, I am trying to stay occupied with sewing…it’s sort of working! 🙂 So yesterday, with the warm sun on my face, I spent a little time looking up some new and different patterns to try.  Here are a few of my favorites!!!   Links to the patterns are below each image! I love the unique and various caps in this particular pattern.  Especially the Round Eared Cap with double ruffle!! 1740-1820 Women and Girls Caps from Amazon Dry Goods I am sure anyone wearing this amazingly beautiful, pleated mantle would feel elegant and very summery!  The only thing I’m not sure of is what fabric I would use….. 1863 Summer Mantle from Amazon Dry Goods With a yardage requirement of 16 yards, this gown would definitely be a commitment, but I love all the ruffles and …

Piping – Is it Needed?

It’s confession time. I have not always used nor understood the point of piping.  I didn’t get it.  I didn’t know when to use it, and I was pretty sure it was a waste of my time. And then, I got a bit better at my sewing.  So I stopped using excuses as to why I didn’t pipe and finally acknowledged that it was because I didn’t know how to use it at all. Piping, in this context, refers to a 1 1/2″-2″ wide strip of fabric, cut on the bias, which has then been folded in half with a piece of cording place in between.  A tight stitch along the side of the cording creates a smooth finish.  This piping is then used in various places on bodices, and occasionally skirts, to add strength, texture, and contrast.  The tricky part is you have to keep your stitches tight. I mean tight.  You just want to see the cording peeping through in a neat and tidy fashion.  And this is where I would become frustrated and …

Regency Chemisette Video Tutorial

I am so excited about today’s post as it has been a long time in coming!  Using inspiration from a variety of sources, I have created a video tutorial and pattern on how to create a Regency Era Chemisette custom designed to fit you!  Simply open up the PDF pattern, follow the guidelines on how to create the pattern pieces, then watch the videos below to  learn how to create your very own chemisette.   Tutorial will help you create a chemisette with one or two ruffles (as pictured in images below.) (Image from Janet Arnold’s Patterns of Fashion I) (Painting of 1800 Empress Elizabeth Alexeievna, artist unknown) REGENCY CHEMISETTE VIDEO TUTORIAL Click the underlined link below to open up PDF pattern. regency-chemisette-pattern ***Videos show how to create a two ruffle chemisette.  If desired, simply cut out two ruffles using measurements presented in pattern**** Part One In this video section, I will show you how to construct the frame of the chemisette and create the neckline darts. Part Two In this section we will stitch darts, …

A 1770’s Fashion Shoot

What better way to start off the new year than with a historical fashion shoot!  This particular shoot highlighted two new 1770’s gown I created last month.  Which was a miracle I was able to get any sewing done, since I spent quite a few weeks hugging the toilet….I’m four months pregnant just in case you missed last week’s post! 🙂 Anyways!!!  I am so happy to be feeling better and what better way to celebrate than with a wonderful snowy day and some wonderful photographs. So with a big thank you to my model Cassandra, here are a few of my favorite images from this fun photo adventure! Both gown are currently for sale on my Etsy Shop along with many new Regency custom order listings!   Well, now I’m going to grab a snack and go work on a 1916 skirt….fingers crossed!!  Have a fabulous Wednesday everyone!  

A 2016 Year End Review

Well, we have made it to the end of 2016 and, boy, what a year!  Many highs, a few lows, and one big life change would sum up my past 12 months.  While I haven’t been able to post as much as I would like over the past few weeks, I plan on getting right back on track for the new year! One of my most favorite posts to do at this time of year is the review of my favorite sewing projects.  I love looking back and seeing all the various creations I have made, and hopefully I will be able to notice a few improvements on my technique as well!  So let’s take a look at a few of my favorite projects from this year!! I loved creating this 1943 ruffled blouse!  Click this link to see how to make one of your own! This 1930’s beach wrap was created from scrap fabric which I got for $1 a yard!!  Love those kinds of savings! One major accomplishment this year was the publication …

An Eye (and Envy) for Detail

Which came first for me? Learning to sew by hand or by machine?  I’m sitting here trying to remember….I think it was by hand first?  Maybe?  Regardless, when I did learn to sew by hand, I remember as a young girl, sitting as patiently as possible with some old scrap of calico, trying to get my stitches as even and neat as possible.  You know, like Laura Ingalls Wilder had to do when she was a child.  I remember really struggling with not bunching up the thread on the back side of the fabric, and trying to make sure knots didn’t form on the thread itself….it was a very stressful experience! 🙂  But, like so many things in life, the more practice and time I put in, the easier and better looking my hand sewing became. This is why when I see any examples of hand sewing so stunning that one questions if a machine did it, it makes me simply giddy with envy and happiness.  Whoever that person was who created that magnificent item, …

A Regency Era Photoshoot

What do you get when you take two friends, a plethora of historical gowns, and two large Pumpkin Spice Lattes?  A wonderfully fun time with some fabulous pictures to prove it!  A few weeks ago I decided that I wanted to photograph a large portion of my historical gown stock using real life models.  So armed with a fully charged camera, my friend Cassandra and I braved the rainy and slightly chilly elements over the past two weekends to photograph some really stunning images!  And since there are so many pictures to see, I will just get right to it!!   I hope you enjoy!!! Oh and one last picture of Cassandra discovering the most perfect fall leaf of all….lovingly named “Leif Erikson” All of these gowns are available on my Etsy Shop! I hope you enjoyed these photos as they were an absolute delight to take! Have a fabulous Monday!!