BONUS POST Dressing like a 1860’s Woman: The Order of Clothing

2021 Edit 

 *While this post is over 10 years old, it is still a great visual source for the proper layers to an 1860’s ensemble.  Enjoy a young mid-20’s Aimee! :-)*

 

There can be a bit of confusion of all the various items one should wear when dressing as a 1860’s lady, and in what order all of these items belong. I have created a picture tutorial of what I humbly think (based on research and practicality) the order of events should be when dressing. Hope this helps!
Step One:
Put on stockings and garters.
r1

Step Two:
Put on chemise and corset. Lace up corset as tight as you can but make sure you still feel comfortable and can breathe normally.
r2

Step Three:
Do your hair. I find that this is the best point to create one’s hairstyle. This way you have the basic foundation of clothing on, yet you can still move fairly easily.
r14

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General Overview of Fashion Video Series 1800-1855

Every so often, I will be asked by a museum or living history group to give a brief, but encompassing talk on fashion from the 19th century.  That is a rather tall order to talk about a hundred years of fashion….as there is just SO MUCH to talk about.  However, for those who really have no idea about the fashion of the 1800’s, this is such a great way to start.  A person can see the subtle, and not so subtle changes, of fashion which came about through political, social, and mechanical changes/inventions.

I decided to record myself giving this roughly 45 minute talk, but broke them up into smaller videos.  That way a person can watch and rewatch any section they want based on personal interest.

The videos will be divided up into the following decades:

Video 1  Regency (1800-1820) and Romatic Era (1820-1840ish)

Video 2  Early Victorian (1840-1855)

Video 3*  Victorian – Age of the Crinoline (1855-1869)

Video 4*  Victorian – The First Bustle (1870-1879)

Video 5*  Victorian – The Second Bustle (1880-1888) and The Edwardian Era (1889-1900)

*Videos coming out in future posts.

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“What Do I Need to Start” Living History Checklist

Now that you have begun the process of getting connected with a living history group or museum ( you can read that post HERE) it is now time to begin working on what you are going to wear and need.  This really will range on what decade you are doing, whether it is event based or something more continuous, and the weather.  When I start to plan for a new ensemble for living history, I really like to use a checklist.  This way I can keep track of what I have, what I need, and what I need to buy or make.

I have taken my basic checklist and updated it  to include explanations to help guide you as you begin your planning.  The expanded  and detailed outline is below, but you can also download the PDF copy (link below the checklist) to make your own notes.  I highly recommend printing it out and writing all over it.  If you are making items, staple fabric samples on the pages so you can see everything in one place.

Living History Garment Checklist

Do I have the proper type and number of clothing?

Below is a list of just about anything you would need for an historical look.  Do you need to have everything listed?  NO!  But it is a great place to start and see what are your first priorities to purchase, make, or what you already may have.

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Video Series: General Overview of Fashion 1800-1820 (Sample Membership Post)

PLEASE ENJOY THIS SAMPLE 19TH CENTURY LIVING HISTORY MEMBERSHIP POST.

 WANT TO ACCESS MORE?  

CLICK HERE TO START YOUR FREE TRIAL.

The full post featuring videos on the first half of the 19th Century (1800-1855) will be published on June 14th, 2021.  

 

Every so often, I will be asked by a museum or living history group to give a brief, but encompassing talk on fashion from the 19th century.  That is a rather tall order to talk about a hundred years of fashion….as there is just SO MUCH to talk about.  However, for those who really have no idea about the fashion of the 1800’s, this is such a great way to start.  A person can see the subtle, and not so subtle changes, of fashion which came about through political, social, and mechanical changes/inventions.

I decided to record myself giving this roughly 45 minute talk, but broke them up into smaller videos.  That way a person can watch and rewatch any section they want based on personal interest.

The videos will be divided up into the following decades:

Video 1  Regency (1800-1820) and Romatic Era (1820-1840ish)

Video 2* Early Victorian (1840-1855)

Video 3*  Victorian – Age of the Crinoline (1855-1869)

Video 4*  Victorian – The First Bustle (1870-1879)

Video 5*  Victorian – The Second Bustle (1880-1888) and The Edwardian Era (1889-1900)

*Videos coming out in future posts.

 

To start off, we will begin with the Regency Era.  While this era is rather short, politically speaking, it is probably one of the most recognizable styles due to the enduring popularity of Jane Austen novels.  But how many of you know about the Romantic style???  Watch to find out!

 

 

 

I hope you enjoyed this sample post from the 19th Century Living History Membership.  Want to watch the other videos coming out over the next several weeks?  Join now!


Getting Started in Living History

So, you have been thinking for a while about getting involved in living history….maybe even connecting with a local museum or historical chapter.  I mean, you joined a living history membership to try and get connected..that is why you are here!  But you just aren’t sure where to go, what to say, and how to even find a museum or living history group that is interested.

Don’t worry.  We will get you on the right path!

So first off, lets go through the main similarities and differences between living history (a.k.a. Reenacting Groups) and museums.   Museums are (usually) stationary buildings that focus on either a wide or a narrow part of history.  They can feature information on local, state, and national history, or on a particular facet of history (i.e. transportation, women’s history, a specific individual etc.)  Many museums are  a simply display or exhibit only, while others may feature a “living”portion with dressed individuals portraying various parts of historical life.  These individuals may be volunteers (docents) or paid employees.  Living history groups, in comparison, tend to be independently operated and attend and/or create historical events.  Both strive to provide a true, historically authentic experience for both attendees and reenactors.  Both are great places to get involved based on the type of reenacting you are thinking of trying.  And both hope that you have done your research!

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