Month: July 2015

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Sisterhood of the World Bloggers Award

I was very honored to be nominated by Romancing the Sewn for the Sisterhood of the World Blogging Award.  It means so much that others have enjoyed reading my little posts and that I have, hopefully, made a positive contribution to the world of historical sewing. Along with the nomination comes several wonderful questions, provided by Erin and Sophia of Romancing the Sewn, which I have been asked to answer. So without further ado….here we go! What is your favorite classic movie (pre 1970)? It can be for the plot, costumes, songs, sets. I would have to say Seven Brides for Seven Brothers.  While the costumes are in no way historically accurate, they are bright and colorful and evoke such fun!  I also love how athletic the dancing is along with the rousing songs like Sobbin’Women or the Barn Raising Dance.  A true musical classic! If you could make your dream outfit with no time or money constraints what would it be? This is an easy one.  I would make a late 1860’s gown with …

1930's Scarf

A 1930’s Accessory in Ten Minutes or Less…

Looking for the perfect accessory to go with that 1930’s outfit?  Why, yes you are! Have 10 inches of the perfect fabric?  As a matter of fact, yes! Have ten minutes to spare?  Of course! Then this little scarf is for you!  Add another 20 minutes and you can also whip up the flower pin…look for the link to the tutorial below. Supplies: 2 pieces of fabric cut to 10″ x 32″….or however long you would like the scarf. Process: 1. Slightly round the edges of the scarf. 2. Then stitch right sides together, leaving an opening to turn the scarf right side out. 3. Turn scarf right side out, then pin the opening closed. 4. Whipstitch closed.  This side will be the “bottom” of the scarf. 5. Figure out where you would like the scarf to be gathered, and run a long gathering stitch from one side to the other. 6. Gather and secure in place with a few stitches on the backside. 7. Repeat with both sides. Pin around neck and add any decoration …

Beauty Care for the Traveler

Beauty for the Traveler

I don’t know if it is just me, but I never feel that as look as good when I get ready in a hotel versus at home.  I use the same products, apply everything in the same manner, yet I think to myself “eh….it’s been better.”  Then I remember… I forgot my foundation. Yep, that would explain the difference! Oh and that new bottle of sunscreen with the light floral scent I bought specifically for this trip…it’s on the shelf in my linen closet.  Sigh… Perhaps I should have followed this wonderful advice from a 1930’s author: “Vacation time finds us all atingle.  For aren’t we all going somewhere, even if it’s only for a day or so?  Most summers I’ll warrant you’ve planned for your vacation weeks ahead, and then, at the last minute, as an afterthought, you tucked a jar of cold cream in your bag and forgot to take it out until a night or two before you came home.  And, instead of arriving home a dazzling vision of health, your nose …

1920's Dress Cover

One Piece Dress: 1920’s Style

This dress started in the same way that many of my sewing projects have started…with a picture.  A simple, little picture of a dress.  This particular picture was tossed among waves of other dresses, yet it popped right out of the page and straight into my imagination. You see, I have a hard time with 1920’s dresses.  Not because they aren’t cute, or because they aren’t stylish in their own way…but because then have little to no waistline.  And being a girl with a body shape that emphasizes finding said waist, this style goes against the grain.  Nonetheless, the little image of an early 1920’s dress just wiggled it’s way right into my heart, and I knew I had to make one of my own. Created out of a soft yellow cotton with a brown check, this easy-to-create dress is made unique with the three panels that hang down just below the hem.  As always, I have included the pattern as well as the list of materials needed. Pattern: 1920’s One Piece Dress Materials: 5 yards cotton …

Hotel Cover

How to Behave at a Hotel: Advice for the Single Woman in the 1860’s

Following in the footsteps of Monday’s post, once one’s trunk is properly packed, the next step is, of course, to travel.  And much like today’s journeys, overnight stays at a hotel were very common.  While it may not be all that usual for a woman to travel alone during the 1860’s, it was common enough that guidelines were suggested for a lady to follow to ensure a safe and proper trip. “In America, where the mania for traveling extends through all classes, from the highest to the lowest, a few hints upon deportment at a hotel will not be amiss, and these hints are especially addressed to ladies traveling alone. When you arrive at the hotel, enquire at once for the proprietor. Tell him your name and address, and ask him to conduct you to a good room, naming the length of time you purpose occupying it. You may also request him to wait upon you to the table, and allot you a seat. As the hours for meals, at a large hotel, are very numerous, it is best …

Pack a trunk

How to Pack a Trunk in 1870…

At some point in our lives we learn the best way to pack a suitcase.  Whether we learned it from a parent, an instructional tutorial, or through trial and error, efficiently packing a suitcase is a much desired skill that makes the difference between being prepared or being caught without some needed item.  When you take into account all the restrictions placed upon modern travelers, properly packing a suitcase is almost an art form in itself. To learn how a woman in the 1870’s should pack for a journey, read on: “To pack a trunk neatly, everything should be laid out in readiness, neatly folded and sorted, the light articles divided from the heavy ones, and a supply of towels and soft wrapping-paper at hand. Spread a thick, clean towel over the bottom of the trunk, and place upon it the hard, flat things, such as the portfolio, workbox, jewel-box, music books, writing-desk, and boxes; take care to fit them well together, so as to be level on top, filling in crevices with such small articles …

Who's Ahead Cover

Who’s Ahead – Vacation Clothes

It is a warm summer evening and anyone who is anyone is mingling down by the bandstand.  You know, the one in the center of town that has a lovingly placed plaque dating it to some bygone era, where the once crisp white paint is starting to chip and show signs of one too many harsh winters.  The reason for the gathering is clear: the town orchestra is playing a summer concert of past favorites, a few marches, and one or two sing-alongs for the whole crowd to join.  It happens every year and is looked forward to with eager and earnest anticipation by old and young alike.  It has become even more popular to tote along a packed picnic basket of those delightful treats that are musts for outdoor eating.  Cold cut sandwiches, hot dogs, thermoses of hot or cold soup, numerous types of potato salads, and mugs teeming with ice and refreshing lemonade: a feast for all. As the wrist and pocket watches indicate the start of the show along with the customary squeak and …

Travel Poem Cover

Travel: By Edna St. Vincent Millay

Many of us are born with a wandering soul.  That insatiable desire to always see what is past the next mountain peak or what potential beauty awaits around the next bend of the river, drives one’s life.  Some may view these dreamers to never be satisfied or unable to “settle” in one place, but I see them as entrepreneurs, explorers, and kindred spirits. This poem is for them: ~Aimee Cover Painting by Ray Ottulich Poem Painting: The Old Railroad Bridge by Leslie White