Author: aimeevictorianarmoire

baby

All Things Baby…and a Gender Reveal

It has been a very busy two weeks. I have been sewing up a storm and working very hard at this tricky little thing called online marketing.  And since my brain has been swimming with all the things that need to get done, I thought I would take a little mental break.  And what more perfect way to take my mind off all the craziness than to focus on my happy little bundle that is due in less than four months! Four months!! Eeeek!!! 🙂 The past few weeks have also been a bit of a roller coaster when it came to finding out the gender of our baby.  Since I am a planner, and sewer, it was important to me that I find out the gender in advance so I could plan and get as much done as I could before the baby comes.  So when our doctor told us at our 12 week sonogram that she was 85% sure she knew what the gender was, of course, we couldn’t wait to hear!  Imagine our joy …

ts-cover

A Timeline of Fashion’s Influence

A few weeks ago, I was contacted by the British men’s clothing company T.M. Lewin.  While I never have personally purchased clothing from them, I was very aware of the name and longevity. Established in 1898, they have spent the past one hundred years providing high quality men’s clothing and are well-known for the introduction of the button down shirt.  So what, may you ask, is a men’s clothing store doing reaching out to me, a women’s historical clothing blog?  Well, the company wished to celebrate 300 years of British influence on men’s fashion and wondered if I would be interested in participating.  At first, I wasn’t sure what I could do.  I mean, I enjoy men’s clothing, but enough to write about it?  I just wasn’t sure.  So I thought and spent some time studying the fabulous timeline graphic they sent me, and realized the large connection between men and women’s clothing. I thoroughly enjoyed my time researching and loved finding examples of women’s fashion that directly corresponded with men’s. So, with all that said, …

flower

A Little Flower Power

We aren’t even half way through February and I have major garden fever.  I’m craving bulbs, blooms, and bright happy colors.  I’m getting a little sick of looking out my window and seeing various shades of brown.  Sick, I tell you!! A few weeks ago, it had warmed up to shockingly spring like temperatures.  In fact, we had almost three or four days of such warmth that you almost became used to it.  Except it was January, and not March….and one felt a little depressed.  But it wasn’t until I saw the tip of a little bloom from my spring bulbs that one realized the danger of such warmth.  And sure enough, within two days of the bulb sighting, we received 8 inches of snow.  Now all I can do is stare out the window at the snow covered flower bed, and hope my little bulb is okay. So until the outside matches up with my wishes, I shall have to content myself with pictures, decorations, and dreams.  And just in case you are in …

fashion

Fashion Plate Fun

Today I thought it would be fun to browse through a variety of fashion plates!  I mean, who doesn’t love a little gown envy?!   I decided to share a few of my favorites starting around 1830 and going up to 1940.  Ranging from daywear to evening wear, these fashion plates are just the thing to get your fashion juices flowing!   Let’s get started! This 1830’s evening gown is in the most amazing color of blue I have ever seen!   These 1850’s gowns are perfect examples of visiting or afternoon gowns. While it is a toss up between the two, I am in love with the yellow 1860’s ballgown with red floral accents. While I am sure walking was very difficult in this particular creation, I still love the color and pattern combinations of this 1880’s gown. A lovely array of turn of the century shirtwaists.   Sigh….I adore every single one of these 1910’s outfits.   Perfect for summer vacations, these 1920’s outfits are just made for an ocean resort. This soft …

chemisette

Regency Chemisette Video Tutorial

I am so excited about today’s post as it has been a long time in coming!  Using inspiration from a variety of sources, I have created a video tutorial and pattern on how to create a Regency Era Chemisette custom designed to fit you!  Simply open up the PDF pattern, follow the guidelines on how to create the pattern pieces, then watch the videos below to  learn how to create your very own chemisette.   Tutorial will help you create a chemisette with one or two ruffles (as pictured in images below.) (Image from Janet Arnold’s Patterns of Fashion I) (Painting of 1800 Empress Elizabeth Alexeievna, artist unknown) REGENCY CHEMISETTE VIDEO TUTORIAL Click the underlined link below to open up PDF pattern. regency-chemisette-pattern ***Videos show how to create a two ruffle chemisette.  If desired, simply cut out two ruffles using measurements presented in pattern**** Part One In this video section, I will show you how to construct the frame of the chemisette and create the neckline darts. Part Two In this section we will stitch darts, …

vintage-rooms

Vintage rooms I would love to visit….

Sometimes I wish I could redo some room in my house in historical theme and then switch it back when I was through.  Unfortunately I have neither the time, energy, or money to accomplish such a task.  Therefore, I am left to dream about the fun of experiencing and living in various rooms from various time periods…without spending a dime. Here are a few of my favorite vintage rooms I would just love to spend a week living in! While I would never go so aggressive with one color in my bedroom today, I would love to try it out!  And this 1940’s purple inspired room would be so fun! This 1950’s kitchen is so homey and inviting.  I can already smell the apple pie cooking! I would absolutely love to having a living room just like the Ricardo’s second apartment…love the curtains! This 1950’s living room would be a wonderful place to read, chat, or take a nap! Equally as lovely is this 1940’s sitting room!  And who wouldn’t love to sip an ice cold …

pottery

A Look at “Simple” Pottery for the Table

Very few of us today use fancy china more than one or two times a year.  I, unfortunately, fall into that category and find that I much prefer to use my everyday “heartier” dishes.  While this may be the case with many of us today, it is fun to look back and notice that this wasn’t always the case.  Around the late 1880’s using china on a daily basis was the norm, however there began to be a switch around the 1920’s to embracing more humble forms of pottery for the more simpler meals of the day. For example, the following excerpt describes the appropriate times and locations to use more simple pottery. “A third class of tableware is “pottery.”  It is , as a rule, the least carefully, and therefore the least expensively, made tableware…We speak of the simple “tea-room” variety, gay in color and elemental as to decorate, such as all are familiar with.  Some of our readers may have collected pieces of such pottery when traveling in various parts of the world and …

winter-outfits

Winter Outfits: 1870-1940

Another cold snap has hit and brought with it a foot of snow!  I can’t really complain as I love the snow, but it certainly does require quite a bit of bundling up.  On days like this, I pull out my faithful down coat and matching snow boots, suit up, and then head out to brace the winter wind. Of course, I promise myself if I can complete all my errands without too much resentment towards the bitter cold, then I can have a nice hot cup of cocoa when I come home…its a great compromise! So despite the chill outside, today’s post is all about warm and stylish winter clothing!  To start with, I found this fascinating timeline on gdfalksen.com.  I absolutely love the purple tones and enjoy seeing the change of fashion. Image by gdfalksen.com And out of all these lovely looks, I found some extras that I just had to include! Here are two 1880’s ensemble, with one featuring a lovely face veil. This 1918 look has a lovely matching fur collar and …