All posts filed under: Inspiration Board

favorites

November Favorites

There just so many things that have been inspiring me lately.  From baking, to art, to fashion and sewing, I just can’t get enough!  I really had to work hard to trim down this month’s selection as I could have kept adding gown after gown and photo after photo.  However, I stayed focused and am very excited to share with you the five images and ideas that get my creative and fashion juices flowing! First off let’s start with this absolutely fabulous late 1850’s gown.  I mean talk about a colorful, vibrant gown that is perfect for any holiday dinner or tea.  I can’t imagine the amount of patience needed to attach all the trim to the skirt! My next monthly favorite comes in the form of baking.  With Thanksgiving just around the corner, everyone is busy creating the perfect fall pie!  And wouldn’t it be fun to try some different decorations for the pie crust?  I certainly think so!  Martha Stewart has some fabulous options: Decorative Pie Crusts from Martha Stewart This painting is absolutely captivating.  The …

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On My Inspiration Board: Camel Gowns

I have learned several things in preparation of today’s post. The camel color stems from the use of camel hair as a fabric which has been used for centuries. The term cameline describes a knock off the above mentioned fabric of camel hair. The color camel is very subjective from decade to decade and person to person. Is it going out on a limb to say that camel looks good on everyone?  I think that it does.  In finding images for my board, I noticed that people of all ages and colors looked great in this warm tan tone.  I personally love camel and have several pieces of it in my wardrobe.  As neutral as navy, brown, or black, camel offers a more sophisticated look.  And designers have made a fortune launching this color into high fashion. But what about historical fashion?  Well, this was a bit tricky.  I was able to find a few examples of camel colored gowns, however there appeared to be a large gap from 1830-1860.  In between these decades, brown seems …

e gowns

On My Inspiration Board: Embroidered Gowns

Whenever I watch a Jane Austen or Charlotte Bronte film, I always notice how many scenes have women sitting and embroidering.  While embroidering has never been a skill I have any great comfort with, I so admire the patience that goes into creating such unique pieces.  In addition to beauty, excellent embroidery (in the 18th and 19th century) was also a sign of your success at being a woman.  From samplers, to large designs, to small decals on ribbons, creating lovely scenes through thread was a talent to be embraced and cultivated. And when one looks back at gowns from the past two hundred years, the value placed upon such embroidered additions has not wavered.  Even today, when I see an embroidered design, even on garments in modern department stores, I find it more beautiful and attractive…and often worth the extra penny it will cost to take it home.  I am sure the same can be said of women a hundred years ago, as they painstakingly took the time to decorate their gowns with signs …

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On My Inspiration Board: Striped Gowns

Did you notice anything different about my blog this morning? That’s right, a new logo!!!! I am so excited to have a brand new logo designed for me by Susan of LogoLane.  Evoking the color, beauty, and love of historical fashion, this new logo continues to be a step forward in creating a better blog and a better business!  Cue excited squeal!!! 🙂 Alright, now onto the real stuff! I am delving into a topic that may be a joyous thing for some women or a bad memory for others.  I’m talking stripes.  Those pesky little lines that could either create a sleek line or make one feel (as I have in the past) that they are as wide as a barn (forgive the horrible analogy…but I’m sure we have all been there.) Yet, despite the riskiness that these little parallel lines can hold, designers and seamstresses alike have been creating garments featuring the stripe for centuries.  Why?  Well, amongst many reasons, it is visually striking, allows for fun color coordination, and if properly done, can …

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On My Inspiration Board: Calico Gowns

It is hard to believe that a fabric which evokes simplicity, homey-ness, and (if you are me) Little House on the Prairie, has a very fascinating and international history.  Originating from Calicut, India, the fabric we know as calico gained popularity from it’s early 11th century birth and well into our modern age.  Known for a sold color on which a simply design repeats all over, calico has become a much used piece of fabric. An example of an early calico fabric Long used for a variety of sewing projects which ranged from dresses to quilts to kitchen linens, calico is easily one of the most widely used and widely appreciated fabrics around.  The other wonderful thing about calico is it’s very affordable price tag.  I love picking up yards of happy calico, even if I don’t have a particular project in mind, because of its versatility.  While not exactly known for it’s luxury, there are many examples of gowns constructed from calico.  In fact, Hollywood has some wonderfully fun samples of calico dresses, even …

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On My Inspiration Board: Lavender Gowns

Everyone at some point in their lives goes through a lavender phase.  I remember mine was in jr. high and into high school where most of my clothes, and my room, was covered in various tones of lavender.  It is such an easy color to love and looks great on a variety of skin tones.  While researching and choosing gowns to feature in this post, I was delighted to see so many examples from a variety of time periods.  It seems woman through out the past two hundred years have also seen the appeal that lavender has to offer. I also found some absolutely wonderful paintings featuring lavender hued gowns!  Here are a few of my favorites: While two of the three are trimmed in darker purple tones, they are overall wonderful examples of lavender gowns. With so many beautiful examples, it was (as usual) hard to choose ones to highlight, so as always, make sure to hop over to my Pinterest Page to see more gowns. Looking for a modern lavender gown to wear …

pearls

Pearls, pearls, pearls….

Classy, elegant, and if purchasing fresh water, quite affordable.  Pearls have long been used as jewelry for the upper classes, but gradually became a part of the average woman’s wardrobe thanks to the ever glamorous Coco Chanel.  While I am personally a single strand wearer, there are so many different types with multiple layers in multiple lengths, that the easiest thing is to purchase one of each kind! 🙂 In preparation for this post, I have scoured and found several photographs that range from the 1860’s to the 1950’s featuring a wide variety of pearl necklaces. What I love about pearls, in comparison with other fine pieces of jewelry, is that they can be worn just as easily with casual outfits as with elegant ones. Here are a few of my favorite modern pieces of pearl jewelry in a variety of affordable prices. Modern Pearl Necklace from Amanda Deer – Starts at $36 Back Drop Pearl Necklace from Jam Jewels 1  – Starts at $68 Multi-Strand Pearl Necklace from Lola and Madison – $95 So drape …

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On My Inspiration Board: Polka Dots

Polka dots.  The fashion world’s happiest fabric.  Who would have thought that by placing circles on a piece of cloth, one would instantly be able to brighten up a mood or even a room!   Just like many types of fabric patterns, polka dots had limited appeal in the early 19th century, gradually becoming more common as each decade past.  The wonderful thing about polk dots is it’s ability to transform from casual wear to evening wear, by letting the size of the dot, the lay of the fabric, and the design of the gown dictate it’s level of formality. Even artists have seen the marvelous appeal of the polka dot.  In my opinion, the most famous painting of a polka dot dress is Albert Bartholomé’s Dans la Serre (1881), a stunning piece of work featuring the artist’s wife. The dress itself, has been saved and put on display, not only for it’s artistic value but it’s fashion design as well. Over the past 100 years, the appeal of the polka dot has not diminished …