Regency Chemisette Video Tutorial

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I am so excited about today’s post as it has been a long time in coming! 

Using inspiration from a variety of sources, I have created a video tutorial and pattern on how to create a Regency Era Chemisette custom designed to fit you!  Simply open up the PDF pattern, follow the guidelines on how to create the pattern pieces, then watch the videos below to  learn how to create your very own chemisette.  

Tutorial will help you create a chemisette with one or two ruffles (as pictured in images below.)

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(Image from Janet Arnold’s Patterns of Fashion I)

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(Painting of 1800 Empress Elizabeth Alexeievna, artist unknown)

REGENCY CHEMISETTE VIDEO TUTORIAL

Click the underlined link below to open up PDF pattern.

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***Videos show how to create a two ruffle chemisette.  If desired, simply cut out two ruffles using measurements presented in pattern****

Part One

In this video section, I will show you how to construct the frame of the chemisette and create the neckline darts.

Part Two

In this section we will stitch darts, sew cording/ribbon channels, and begin to work on the ruffle.

Part Three

This portion will show you how to pleat the ruffle.  

Part Four

Now that the ruffle is pleated, this part will show you how to create the ruffled neckline in order to attach it to the chemisette.

Part Five

This last video details attaching the ruffle to the neckline and completing all the finishing touches.

And that’s it!  

Feel free to play around and create various styles and necklines of chemisettes!  

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And as always, feel free to share a picture of your own creation on social media!  

  Simply post on my Facebook page or use the tag #aimeevictorian on Instagram.  Links to both platforms are on the sidebar of my blog!

Happy Sewing!

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Cover Painting

By Pierre Louis Bouvier GENEVA 1766 – 1836

Sources Used:

Janet Arnold Patterns of Fashion 1

Various of paintings from 1805-1015

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Is it a Match? 1910’s Jewelry and their Modern Counterparts

1910 jewelry

How many times have you wanted something and just couldn’t have it?  If you are anything like me it has happened only about a million times.  And when you realize that you are one of those individuals that can trace some ancestry to a raccoon (as I too love shiny, sparkly things), than you may have to embrace a strategy I like to call “finding an alternative.”  If I can’t find it, I will try to make it.  If I can’t afford it, I will try to find a really good look alike.  And if I can’t have anything but the original, than I will save and wait patiently until I can.  The last option doesn’t happen all that often.

So when it comes to trying to find reproduction pieces, it can be rather tricky to locate an affordable and suitable option.  But with a little bit of time and energy, you too can make all your sparkly dreams come true.

So with that in mind, I decided I wanted to write a post on late Edwardian jewelry and some modern alternatives.  Edwardian fashion is such a wonderful dichotomy of simplicity with traces of its Victorian heritage, but not quite the art deco that will replace it.  So, I have found three of my most favorite examples of this simplistic style with some lovely adaptations that all seem to hover around the $35 mark.  So, if you love all things Downtown Abbey but can’t afford the real deal….than this post is for you!

To start with is a lovely young lady wearing a modesty brooch.  I found a stunning example through Overstock.

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Silver Brooch from Overstock  – $34

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This stunning necklace features a large medallion on a long black cord.  While difficult to find an exact replica, I believe I found one that is the essence of the style.

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Long Cord Necklace with Medallion from MarKi Jewelry  – $34

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I adore this necklace and love the dress that goes with it.  Sigh…..  The necklace I found features more beads than the original but I feel would be a perfect piece to wear with this dress.

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Three Strand Hampton Necklace from Shoptiques  – $38

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So whether you are looking to accessorize a 1910’s outfit, or simply to bring a little nostalgia into your modern life, these pieces would fit like a glove!

Happy Hunting!

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Did you know that Aimee’s Victorian Armoire Shop now features several instant downloadable patterns?  Click HERE to see the current options available.


The Charm of Dress: Accessories

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“Of course, you know the woman who dresses like every other women?  You remember her in sort of a collective sense, and it is not a a very pleasing sense either.  She is a duplicate that makes no distinct impression on your mind.  She lacks personality.  She simply goes along.

Perhaps it is her manner which is devoid of character.  Perhaps it is her dress which is without individual charm.  But whatever the reason of the defect, there must be a remedy for it.

Since there are dress talks, let us consider the responsibility of dress in achieving distinctiveness, always remembering that when dress reaches its perfection a perfect manner attends it.

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If all women dressed alike, no matter how rich the fabric or how chic and clever the cut, their dress would be accepted without being noticed.  A uniform has its greatest distinction either when it has never been seen except on one person alone, and thus the sense of uniformity is entirely eliminated, or when it is worn by a number of persons acting together, because then it gives the impression of an individual charm.

Charm in dress is hard to define, yet all are swift to recognize it.  There is always an unexpected quality in it. It piques and holds the attention throughout a variation which is an improvement of the usual.

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And this unexpected quality is most often the expression of individual taste, introduced into the costume by different smart little accessories.  These give the touch of life to dress which saves it from monotony.

Of course, the wearing has much to do with it.  To each woman who wishes always to look her best, the accessory is often a saving grace.

Style and fashion are the features of the dress, but accessories are its expression.  The dress which lacks accessories – touches of individual taste – is like the dress on a form in the shop.  It is dumb.  The dress which is vibrant with impressions is the dress which reveals the life of the wearer.  It is distinctive, because its accessories make it so. They sound the personal note.

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An accessory may be a very humble detail of dress and yet give tone to the whole costume.  In selecting accessories for different costumes, it is important that the right accessory be used with the right costume.  In an attractive face, you know, the features and the expression match.  Together they make what charms.

The young woman, or the older woman for that matter, who has tried and found becoming some special accessory, should wear it so often that it is associated with her.  She should make it her own.

Wealth may buy these things, or thrift may make them; but it is taste that must put them on.  Taste, then, is the one thing needful.  Without it, a woman is clad; with it, a woman is dressed.

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Source:

The Magic of Dress: by Grace Margaret Gould.  1911

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What a Difference a Collar Can Make!

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Have an old dress that could use an update?  Your latest sewing experiment didn’t turn out so well?  Can’t find just the right necklace to complete an outfit?  

Have you tried a collar?  

Take a look at these examples of 1930’s gowns that feature collars in various forms.

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The beauty of a collar, whether ruffly or simple, is it’s ability to dress-up an outfit with very little effort.  

Want to create a collar that is very similar to the last picture?  

Well, click the picture below to be taken to a tutorial I created a few months ago!

1930's Scarf

 

Accessories, and especially collars, can truly make an outfit!  

Enjoy!

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Vintage Inspired Makeup Bag Tutorial

makeup bag

With such an easy design and construction, this makeup bag can be yours in as little as 60 minutes!  

Make several in different sizes and coordinating fabrics for a truly personalized collection.

Enjoy!

Pattern:

Vintage Makeup Bag Pattern 

Materials:

  • Fabric scraps in coordinating colors
  • 7 -9″ zipper
  • Ribbon/ lace trims
  • buttons

Process:

  1. Sew the two smaller top pieces right-sides together.  Repeat for other side.

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2. Attach the larger square to the smaller piece, right sides together. Press.

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3. Attach trim where desired on each side.

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4. Insert zipper on top of bag.

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Putting in a zipper5. Stitch the two sides together making sure to get the edges of the top that border the zipper ends.  Trim seams and turn right side out.

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6. Decorate the outside as desired.  Attach ribbon to the zipper for easy opening.

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Now fill with your favorite cosmetics!

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Tulip Shaped Apron

Fun, floral, and fall-inspired all describe this one of a kind apron.  Perfect as a gift for a friend, a family member, or for yourself!

Materials:

  • 1 yard solid fabric
  • 3/4-1 yard contrast fabric

Pattern:

Tulip Apron Pattern

Process:

  1. Begin by sewing the bottom of each “petal” to the top, right sides together.  This is a little tricky as you have a pretty sharp turn to make in the middle, but with a little patience, you will end up with a clean look.

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2. Stitch all the petals together, right sides.  Press and trim excess fabric near seams.

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3. Hem all the raw edges.  Take your time around the edge of the apron to ensure a crisp and rounded edge.

4. Mark center of tie and pin to the center of the apron.  Continue pinning on both sides until you reach the end of the apron.  Stitch.

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5.  Fold the waistband on itself, right sides together and pin from the end of the apron to the rod of the ties.  Stitch and then turn right side out.  Leave the middle of the waistband (part connected to the apron) free.

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6.  Fold the middle of the waistband over the wrong side of the apron and pin.

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7.  Whipstitch or stitch in the ditch.

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8.  Give it a good press, and you are all done!

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Happy Sewing!

~Aimee

 


A 1940’s Hair Piece

This little accessory can be created for under $5 and takes only about 10 minutes!  

I highly recommend creating one of these hair pieces if you can’t find/afford a hat that goes with your ensemble but can’t bear the thought of a bare head.  I created mine with a fall theme, but you can design one for any season.  Try holly for Christmas, daffodils for Easter, or magnolias for the summer…the possibilities are truly endless.

Materials:

  • 1/2 yard tulle
  • silk flowers
  • a hair comb
  • wire or needle and thread
  • wire snips

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Because the two flowers I wanted to use were attached to a floral pick, I began by removing them.  They had enough wire attached to their stems, that I did not need any additional wire…but feel free to use some if you just have flower heads.

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Next, cut out a piece of tulle that measures 24″ x 21″ the wider part being the width of the veil and will be gathered to the comb.  Fold in half.  I used weights to keep the tulle from shifting.

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Round off the bottom of the tulle to desired length and shape.  My finished veil measured 22″ wide by 18″ long.

DSC_0058Run a gathering stitch along the widest part of the tulle.  Gather to fit the hair comb.  Tie off if needed.

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Sew to the hair comb.  Be careful how you attach this part.  I wanted the hair comb to go straight back into my hair (think tiara) and have the veil lay over my face.  Because of this, I was careful to sew the tulle so no messy edge would be visible from the front.

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Now attach your flowers.  Again, the veil should go over your flowers as well, so make sure that you attach them on the wrong side of the tulle.   If you look at the above picture, the flowers will be attached on top of the tulle, and the tulle will fall over it.  Wire or sew to the hair comb.

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**Underneath of the comb

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**The above picture shows the hair piece with the comb part facing the camera.

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And thats it!  Very easy, affordable, and adjustable to outfit, season, and personal taste.

Here are a few examples of flower hair pieces.  Imagine these with tulle in a variety of hues and textures!

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Happy Designing!

~Aimee

 


From Man’s Shirt to Woman’s Apron

This little apron is truly remarkable when you consider it was made from the sleeves of a man’s shirt!  

 A common practice during the Depression Era as well as World War II, this apron breathes new life into an old piece of clothing.

 Try this with any shirt or pattern you like!

Materials:

  • one large/ x-large man’s shirt

Process:

Lay the shirt out flat and then cut out the sleeves.

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Cut the sleeves in half down the seam, right above the placket.

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Stitch the two edges together.  You want the small points to be on the outside of the apron.

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Now trim off the excess fabric to create a smooth shape.

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Hem all sides.

Next, cut out the top panel from the bottom of the shirt.  This natural curve of the shirt creates a nice line for the top of the apron.  My panel is 9″ by 7″.  Hem three sides, then attach to the apron waist band, right sides together.

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Cut one side seam of the shirt to free the front panel.  Cut out two ties (about 3″ wide each) up to the shoulder seam.

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Make the ties, then stitch, right sides together, to the apron waistband!

To wear, simply pin top panel at desired place, then tie around waist.

That’s it!  Enjoy your new apron!!

~Aimee

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