Month: March 2017

A Touch of the 1920’s

Today’s post is all about appreciating the various aspects of life during the 1920’s.  From recipes to fashion and a bit in between, I hope you enjoy these reflections of the past.  And of course, I hope you will try one of the delicious recipes provided below…I know I will! 🙂 Spring weddings are the perfect time to choose something bright and cheerful!  I love the cut of the green dress! Finding the perfect wave and bob is such an eternal struggle.  Maybe these images will help spark some ideas! Upcoming rainy days mean bringing out the old reliable rain coat!  This stylish lady has both a matching hat and jacket in a happy shade of blue! This lady is not only impeccably dressed, she is also in a stunning location! Host a spring tea party and make a few of these little treats to serve! I adore house plans, and this little bungalow is equal parts quaint and charming! Happy 1920’s my friends!

My March Favorites

March is all about green in my opinion.  It represents life, regrowth, and, of course, shamrock shakes from McDonalds.  And even though I currently find myself engulfed in a rather large snow storm, I am all about any signs of green and spring! So here are my five favorite things for March!! I adore the light green color of this 1920’s gown.  Everything about it is elegant and simple.  Even the belt is perfectly place! 1920’s Green Dress – Ensemble by Paul Poiret (French, Paris 1879–1944 Paris) Date: 1925–26  Spring flowers belong in a spring vase.  And this pitcher from Joann Fabrics is perfect! Pitcher from Joann Fabrics If Dorothy had a emerald option in addition to her ruby slippers, I am most certain these beauties would be it!! Gabriella Crystal Pumps by Royal Vintage Shoes  Two things about this painting strike me.  One, I love the unique color of green in the gown.  Second, I adore anything that uses the color combinations of green and pink.  Lovely! Portrait of Juliane Fürstin zu Schaumburg-Lippe c.1781 by Johann Heinrich …

Piping – Is it Needed?

It’s confession time. I have not always used nor understood the point of piping.  I didn’t get it.  I didn’t know when to use it, and I was pretty sure it was a waste of my time. And then, I got a bit better at my sewing.  So I stopped using excuses as to why I didn’t pipe and finally acknowledged that it was because I didn’t know how to use it at all. Piping, in this context, refers to a 1 1/2″-2″ wide strip of fabric, cut on the bias, which has then been folded in half with a piece of cording place in between.  A tight stitch along the side of the cording creates a smooth finish.  This piping is then used in various places on bodices, and occasionally skirts, to add strength, texture, and contrast.  The tricky part is you have to keep your stitches tight. I mean tight.  You just want to see the cording peeping through in a neat and tidy fashion.  And this is where I would become frustrated and …