On My Inspiration Board: Patterned Gowns

I decided to bring back an old post favorite which I haven’t done in a while: On My Inspiration Board!  For this post, I choose either a color, pattern, shape, or type of gown and collect my favorites to share from the years 1800-1950.  For today’s version, I decided to choose gowns made out a of patterned fabric.  Whether geometric, floral, or striped, these gowns are wonderful examples of fabric design and gown creation!

In my daily wardrobe, I don’t really wear a whole lot of patterns.  Yet when it comes to my sewing, I adore using patterns.  Any type of pattern using any type of colors.  I simply love it.  And based on all my research, I am not alone!  From morning gowns, to tea gowns, to evening gowns, patterns have been a favorite for decades.

This particular painting shows how embroidery create a lovely pattern on this elegant 1810’s court dress.  Perhaps not a gown to be worn by the average woman, bust still stunning!

Duchess Talleyrand-Périgord, Princess Dorothea by Joseph Chabord

This gown from the late 1800’s is a wonderful example of the striking impact a good pattern can create!  Not only does the cut of the gown highlight the pattern, but the black and white stripe is absolutely eye catching!

While there are so many options out there, I did my best to select a variety of gowns from a variety of time periods.  So, without further ado, here is this month’s Inspiration Board!

To see more gowns, feel free to visit my Pinterest Board!

Happy Tuesday!

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My May Favorites

Summer is almost here!!  How do I know?  Well, apart from the increased sound of lawn mowers up and down the neighborhood, I can now leave the house without a jacket!  A wonderful change if you ask me!!

And since it is almost summer, and a new month, it is time to share with you my favorite list of things I am loving or wishing to try!

All links are below each image.

To start this month’s favorites list off, I have chosen the sweetest little romper. With my own little girl due next month, I am all about sweet, simple clothes to dress her in!! 🙂

Bailey Blossoms – Blueberry Pie Romper

Not only am I in love with the soft green of this gown, I am also on a 1890’s kick!  I love the 1700’s influence seen in the back fabric drape.

1890’s Tea Gown from the John Bright Collection

Even though I am still rocking maternity clothes, I thought this jacket from Modcloth would still be a wonderful addition to both my maternity and regular wardrobe.  Pair it with skinny jeans and a pair of flats…and maybe a mocha latte! Perfect!!

Jacket from Modcloth

This little thimble key chain is the perfect gift for a fellow sewing enthusiast or for yourself!

Thimble Key Chain from Gustav’s Dachshunds Shop

And with it being May 1st, I have to include these up-cycled May Day baskets….the perfect thing to brighten up those rainy days!

May Day Baskets from The Princess and the Frog Blog

Happy May 1st Everyone!!!


Historical Fashion Shoot at The Buffalo Niagara Heritage Village

Last Saturday, I had the extreme privilege of being allowed special access to photograph my gowns in and around the historic buildings belonging to the Buffalo Niagara Heritage Village.    This museum not only features many wonderful exhibits for both young and old, but they also have twelve historical buildings that have been painstakingly and lovingly returned to historical accuracy.  A truly wonderful place for the whole family where you can take a step back in time!

Here are a few outside pictures of the buildings apart of this wonderful village!

Aren’t they stunning!?  Sigh….

Anyways!  This past Saturday, I loaded up a a variety of gowns, two great friends, and spent a fabulous afternoon enjoying the warm sunshine and all things historical!!

Enjoy!!

 

A big thank you to Buffalo Niagara Heritage Village for opening up their doors!  We all had a great time and I think the buildings did too! 🙂

 

Many of these gowns are available for purchase on my Etsy Shop!

 

Have you joined my Facebook Group Inside Aimee’s Armoire?  Join now to connect with other historical fashion enthusiasts!

Click image to join!

 


A Fashion Excerpt from Good Housekeeping, 1922

I love fashion spreads in magazines. I love seeing the looks, colors, styles, and accessories that are currently (or have been) in trend…no matter what the decade.  And today’s spread is no exception!

Another thing that I absolutely adore about these early women’s magazines are how varied and detailed the topics are compared to today’s.  You especially get that vibe when you read the descriptions of each outfit and accessory.  It isn’t simply a list of the maker and price.  Instead it is a lovely little blurb highlighting the main points of each item along with a wonderful description of color.  

I hope you enjoy taking a little look back at not only fashion from the 1920’s, but also into the setup and work that went in to creating these wonderful magazine pieces! 🙂

Fashions Edited by Helen Kous

Good Housekeeping, April, 1922 Volume 74, Number 4

Have you joined my new Facebook Group Inside Aimee’s Armoire?????  

No???  

Well hop on over and join now!  

It’s all about sharing love and support for projects revolving around historical fashion in whatever medium you love!!

Click image above to join now!

 



A Touch of the 1920’s

Today’s post is all about appreciating the various aspects of life during the 1920’s.  From recipes to fashion and a bit in between, I hope you enjoy these reflections of the past.  And of course, I hope you will try one of the delicious recipes provided below…I know I will! 🙂

Spring weddings are the perfect time to choose something bright and cheerful!  I love the cut of the green dress!

Finding the perfect wave and bob is such an eternal struggle.  Maybe these images will help spark some ideas!

Upcoming rainy days mean bringing out the old reliable rain coat!  This stylish lady has both a matching hat and jacket in a happy shade of blue!

This lady is not only impeccably dressed, she is also in a stunning location!

Host a spring tea party and make a few of these little treats to serve!

I adore house plans, and this little bungalow is equal parts quaint and charming!

Happy 1920’s my friends!


Piping – Is it Needed?

piping

It’s confession time.

I have not always used nor understood the point of piping.  I didn’t get it.  I didn’t know when to use it, and I was pretty sure it was a waste of my time.

And then, I got a bit better at my sewing.  So I stopped using excuses as to why I didn’t pipe and finally acknowledged that it was because I didn’t know how to use it at all.

Piping, in this context, refers to a 1 1/2″-2″ wide strip of fabric, cut on the bias, which has then been folded in half with a piece of cording place in between.  A tight stitch along the side of the cording creates a smooth finish.  This piping is then used in various places on bodices, and occasionally skirts, to add strength, texture, and contrast.  The tricky part is you have to keep your stitches tight. I mean tight.  You just want to see the cording peeping through in a neat and tidy fashion.  And this is where I would become frustrated and give up…I just couldn’t seem to make my stitches tight enough.

So piping was left on the back burner for several years, until one day when I decided to try it again.

I took a deep breath, stitched as close as as could to the cording and would you believe it!!! – It came out perfectly!!  In fact, it looked so great, I couldn’t believe I hadn’t been using this technique all along.  So now I’m back on the piping train and loving it!  And I thought nothing would do but to create a post celebrating this wonderful little technique.

My return to piping on a 1860’s Garibaldi blouse.

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Piping is most commonly found around the armsyce, or armhole, of bodices from the early 20th century and back.  Here is an example of an 1840’s gown from the Tasha Tudor collection:

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Notice the cord like piece between the sleeve gathers and the shoulder?  That’s piping!  While most commonly used in the same fabric as the gown itself, one can sometimes use coordinating fabric to add a bit of pop!

Piping can also be used in between bodice seams. Notice the very small piping along the back seams of this 1860’s bodice as well as the 1810’s Pelisse.

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Piping can also be used to add details to sleeves…

notice the sleeve of this Regency jacket.  The piping adds interest.

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The same can be said for this 1860’s sleeve where the bands have piped edges.

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And let’s not forget the rather advanced skill of putting piping around the edges of bodices to keep a smooth and clean finish!

This 1840’s gold gown has some wonderful examples:

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If you have never tried piping, or haven’t in a long time, I highly recommend bringing back this very fun and relatively easy technique!!

 

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Getting Attached to “Detachable” Items

collars

If you are interested in getting a different look for your outfit, accessories can make a huge difference!  Today, we mostly turn to scarves and jewelry to spice up or alter our clothes.  However, these go-tos were not always the first choice in decades past.  Many women used what we can think of as “detachable” items that were either pinned, buttoned, or basted onto their clothes. This allowed for everyday clothes to be given a little pick-me-up for a very affordable price.  Simply remove for cleaning and then use on any garment that could use a little something extra.

Collars were the most common form of the “detachable” items, although under sleeves, as seen during the Regency era or during the 1850’s-1860’s, were also quite common.  Mostly made of stark white cotton, linen, or lace, these little beauties came in various sizes, shapes, and textures.

This 1860’s lace capelet/collar is fascinating as it appears to be covering up an evening gown…perhaps making it more appropriate for daywear!

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This woman wears both a detachable collar as well as under sleeves, a very common and economic look during the 1860’s.

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Although some color enhancements on this particular  1860’s image highlight the trim, notice the wide Peter Pan collar and ruffled under sleeves.  

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Here are a few more wonderful examples from the 1860’s of collars, chemisettes, and under sleeves showing the wide variety a woman could create for herself.

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Women’s fashion at the turn of the century also featured detachable collars, although I must say they look extremely uncomfortable to wear!

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Detachable collars also saw a rebirth during the 1930’s in a wide range of sizes, lengths, and finishes!

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So why not create your own detachable item for that blouse or dress that maybe has seen better days!

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