All posts tagged: fashion

On My Inspiration Board: Coral Gowns

Happy Thanksgiving week everyone!!   I can’t believe we are already at Thanksgiving!  While I feel that the summer went by at a normal pace, this fall has simply flew!! I have been very busy sewing these past days, not only getting ready for Black Friday and Cyber Monday on my shop (click HERE to see all the deals), but also with some fun projects just for the heck of it!  One such project, was this 1810’s day gown in such a fun shade of coral-ly pink. Now I know, that like so many colors, what one person may think is coral may not be what another person would describe it as.  So if you are sitting at home thinking that none of the gowns in this post are coral…that’s okay!  Agree to disagree! 🙂  Regardless, something about this happy color just sent me on a coral-hunting mission, and while there are not very many historical examples out there in coral, there are a few! Lets start with this lovely painting called La Jeune Musicienne created …

September Favorites

FALL IS HERE!!!!  I am so excited and can’t wait to embark on all my favorite autumnal activities!  From apple picking to watching football, I plan to enjoy each and every deliciously cool day! And with the start of a new season and a new month, it is time for another favorites post…and boy, do I love what I have to share today!  So lets not wait another minute and get right into it! Scarlet Red 1865 Day Gown Stunning, vibrant, and delicately trimmed, everything about this gown is stunning!  I especially love the ribbon and medallion on the skirt. The Wardrobe Shop  A week ago, I was contacted by the Wardrobe Shop.  They are a lovely online shop and blog that specializes in vintage clothing from the early 20th century!  Definitely worth a look.  One of my favorite pieces is the pearl handbag!!  Very elegant!!  Click links below to check them out! Wardrobe Shop    Vintage Inspired Pearl Handbag Cardigans from Loft I am obsessed with cardigans this season!  One of my favorites is …

1940’s Blouse Pattern and Tutorial

This blouse is such a quick and easy way to take an extra yard of fabric and turn it into something special!  Add some pizzaz with different fabrics, contrasting colors, and trims!!  The possibilities are endless! What you will need:   1 yard of fabric* 12″ of 1/2″ wide elastic Thread * To create a larger size, simply create a larger square – 40″ x 40″, 42″ x 42″, etc This pattern can be created by simply measuring and cutting the actual fabric, however the pictures below are shown on a large piece of craft paper.   The Process Fold a 36″ by 36″ piece of fabric (or paper) into a triangle. Mark the neck between the two end points. Measure 13-15″ from center of neck towards one point.  Mark this point.  The length will be the sleeve, so make it as long or as short as you would like.  Then cut off the triangle.  Repeat with the other side. Allow 8-10″ for armhole then stitch (right sides together) 4-5″ down from this point.  This line …

Historical Patterns I’m Excited to Try!

I think I have drained my current pool of patterns.  I mean, I love many of them and will always use them…but, I’m am definitely feeling a little bored.   Especially with my due date coming closer and closer, I am trying to stay occupied with sewing…it’s sort of working! 🙂 So yesterday, with the warm sun on my face, I spent a little time looking up some new and different patterns to try.  Here are a few of my favorites!!!   Links to the patterns are below each image! I love the unique and various caps in this particular pattern.  Especially the Round Eared Cap with double ruffle!! 1740-1820 Women and Girls Caps from Amazon Dry Goods I am sure anyone wearing this amazingly beautiful, pleated mantle would feel elegant and very summery!  The only thing I’m not sure of is what fabric I would use….. 1863 Summer Mantle from Amazon Dry Goods With a yardage requirement of 16 yards, this gown would definitely be a commitment, but I love all the ruffles and …

On My Inspiration Board: Patterned Gowns

I decided to bring back an old post favorite which I haven’t done in a while: On My Inspiration Board!  For this post, I choose either a color, pattern, shape, or type of gown and collect my favorites to share from the years 1800-1950.  For today’s version, I decided to choose gowns made out a of patterned fabric.  Whether geometric, floral, or striped, these gowns are wonderful examples of fabric design and gown creation! In my daily wardrobe, I don’t really wear a whole lot of patterns.  Yet when it comes to my sewing, I adore using patterns.  Any type of pattern using any type of colors.  I simply love it.  And based on all my research, I am not alone!  From morning gowns, to tea gowns, to evening gowns, patterns have been a favorite for decades. This particular painting shows how embroidery create a lovely pattern on this elegant 1810’s court dress.  Perhaps not a gown to be worn by the average woman, bust still stunning! Duchess Talleyrand-Périgord, Princess Dorothea by Joseph Chabord This gown …

A Fashion Excerpt from Good Housekeeping, 1922

I love fashion spreads in magazines. I love seeing the looks, colors, styles, and accessories that are currently (or have been) in trend…no matter what the decade.  And today’s spread is no exception! Another thing that I absolutely adore about these early women’s magazines are how varied and detailed the topics are compared to today’s.  You especially get that vibe when you read the descriptions of each outfit and accessory.  It isn’t simply a list of the maker and price.  Instead it is a lovely little blurb highlighting the main points of each item along with a wonderful description of color.   I hope you enjoy taking a little look back at not only fashion from the 1920’s, but also into the setup and work that went in to creating these wonderful magazine pieces! 🙂 Fashions Edited by Helen Kous Good Housekeeping, April, 1922 Volume 74, Number 4 Have you joined my new Facebook Group Inside Aimee’s Armoire?????   No???   Well hop on over and join now!   It’s all about sharing love and support for projects revolving …

Piping – Is it Needed?

It’s confession time. I have not always used nor understood the point of piping.  I didn’t get it.  I didn’t know when to use it, and I was pretty sure it was a waste of my time. And then, I got a bit better at my sewing.  So I stopped using excuses as to why I didn’t pipe and finally acknowledged that it was because I didn’t know how to use it at all. Piping, in this context, refers to a 1 1/2″-2″ wide strip of fabric, cut on the bias, which has then been folded in half with a piece of cording place in between.  A tight stitch along the side of the cording creates a smooth finish.  This piping is then used in various places on bodices, and occasionally skirts, to add strength, texture, and contrast.  The tricky part is you have to keep your stitches tight. I mean tight.  You just want to see the cording peeping through in a neat and tidy fashion.  And this is where I would become frustrated and …

Getting Attached to “Detachable” Items

If you are interested in getting a different look for your outfit, accessories can make a huge difference!  Today, we mostly turn to scarves and jewelry to spice up or alter our clothes.  However, these go-tos were not always the first choice in decades past.  Many women used what we can think of as “detachable” items that were either pinned, buttoned, or basted onto their clothes. This allowed for everyday clothes to be given a little pick-me-up for a very affordable price.  Simply remove for cleaning and then use on any garment that could use a little something extra. Collars were the most common form of the “detachable” items, although under sleeves, as seen during the Regency era or during the 1850’s-1860’s, were also quite common.  Mostly made of stark white cotton, linen, or lace, these little beauties came in various sizes, shapes, and textures. This 1860’s lace capelet/collar is fascinating as it appears to be covering up an evening gown…perhaps making it more appropriate for daywear! This woman wears both a detachable collar as well …