All posts tagged: civil war sewing

On My Inspiration Board: Coral Gowns

Happy Thanksgiving week everyone!!   I can’t believe we are already at Thanksgiving!  While I feel that the summer went by at a normal pace, this fall has simply flew!! I have been very busy sewing these past days, not only getting ready for Black Friday and Cyber Monday on my shop (click HERE to see all the deals), but also with some fun projects just for the heck of it!  One such project, was this 1810’s day gown in such a fun shade of coral-ly pink. Now I know, that like so many colors, what one person may think is coral may not be what another person would describe it as.  So if you are sitting at home thinking that none of the gowns in this post are coral…that’s okay!  Agree to disagree! 🙂  Regardless, something about this happy color just sent me on a coral-hunting mission, and while there are not very many historical examples out there in coral, there are a few! Lets start with this lovely painting called La Jeune Musicienne created …

Historical Patterns I’m Excited to Try!

I think I have drained my current pool of patterns.  I mean, I love many of them and will always use them…but, I’m am definitely feeling a little bored.   Especially with my due date coming closer and closer, I am trying to stay occupied with sewing…it’s sort of working! 🙂 So yesterday, with the warm sun on my face, I spent a little time looking up some new and different patterns to try.  Here are a few of my favorites!!!   Links to the patterns are below each image! I love the unique and various caps in this particular pattern.  Especially the Round Eared Cap with double ruffle!! 1740-1820 Women and Girls Caps from Amazon Dry Goods I am sure anyone wearing this amazingly beautiful, pleated mantle would feel elegant and very summery!  The only thing I’m not sure of is what fabric I would use….. 1863 Summer Mantle from Amazon Dry Goods With a yardage requirement of 16 yards, this gown would definitely be a commitment, but I love all the ruffles and …

Historical Fashion Shoot at The Buffalo Niagara Heritage Village

Last Saturday, I had the extreme privilege of being allowed special access to photograph my gowns in and around the historic buildings belonging to the Buffalo Niagara Heritage Village.    This museum not only features many wonderful exhibits for both young and old, but they also have twelve historical buildings that have been painstakingly and lovingly returned to historical accuracy.  A truly wonderful place for the whole family where you can take a step back in time! Here are a few outside pictures of the buildings apart of this wonderful village! Aren’t they stunning!?  Sigh…. Anyways!  This past Saturday, I loaded up a a variety of gowns, two great friends, and spent a fabulous afternoon enjoying the warm sunshine and all things historical!! Enjoy!!   A big thank you to Buffalo Niagara Heritage Village for opening up their doors!  We all had a great time and I think the buildings did too! 🙂   Many of these gowns are available for purchase on my Etsy Shop!   Have you joined my Facebook Group Inside Aimee’s Armoire?  Join now to connect …

Piping – Is it Needed?

It’s confession time. I have not always used nor understood the point of piping.  I didn’t get it.  I didn’t know when to use it, and I was pretty sure it was a waste of my time. And then, I got a bit better at my sewing.  So I stopped using excuses as to why I didn’t pipe and finally acknowledged that it was because I didn’t know how to use it at all. Piping, in this context, refers to a 1 1/2″-2″ wide strip of fabric, cut on the bias, which has then been folded in half with a piece of cording place in between.  A tight stitch along the side of the cording creates a smooth finish.  This piping is then used in various places on bodices, and occasionally skirts, to add strength, texture, and contrast.  The tricky part is you have to keep your stitches tight. I mean tight.  You just want to see the cording peeping through in a neat and tidy fashion.  And this is where I would become frustrated and …

A Regency Era Photoshoot

What do you get when you take two friends, a plethora of historical gowns, and two large Pumpkin Spice Lattes?  A wonderfully fun time with some fabulous pictures to prove it!  A few weeks ago I decided that I wanted to photograph a large portion of my historical gown stock using real life models.  So armed with a fully charged camera, my friend Cassandra and I braved the rainy and slightly chilly elements over the past two weekends to photograph some really stunning images!  And since there are so many pictures to see, I will just get right to it!!   I hope you enjoy!!! Oh and one last picture of Cassandra discovering the most perfect fall leaf of all….lovingly named “Leif Erikson” All of these gowns are available on my Etsy Shop! I hope you enjoyed these photos as they were an absolute delight to take! Have a fabulous Monday!!    

How to Create a Skirt Placket

Knowing how to create a skirt placket is a very easy, yet very vital skill when it comes to sewing.  Whether you sew historical pieces, vintage or modern, a properly sewn placket adds a crisp and tailored look! Begin by taking a 4 inch wide piece of fabric and cut it as as long as you need. I usually cut my plackets 4″ x 10″, but it is up to you. Then press down the top of one long side. Now this part is the key to a properly constructed placket!  Take your skirt and identify where you want the placket: center back, side, front.  Cut the skirt half the measurement of the placket. For example, I will have my cut go down 5″.  Then pin the placket to the edge of this cut, right sides together.   Line up the raw edges until around 2″ on either side of the middle of the cut, then begin to pin the placket 1/4″ above the skirt.  See the pictures below…the skirt is on top of the placket. …

My Favorite 1860’s Sewing Patterns and Finished Projects

Today’s post has been a blast to put together!  I wanted to share some of my favorite sewing patterns, but I wasn’t sure which ones I wanted to share.  So as I was looking back at some of my sewing projects, I decided to do a true throwback and share my favorite 1860’s patterns.  Plus, with reenactment season almost in full swing, this could be the perfect time for all you re-enactors to whip up something new! If you have been following my blog since its beginning, you might have noticed that over the last year  I have expanded my sewing focus from mid 19th century to include more recent decades.  The reasons for this are numerous but the overarching one is passion.  I have learned, the hard way at times, to let my creativity go where it wants to.  If I restrict it to simply one area (decade, century…) I will get burnt out rather quickly and will end up with large droughts of uninspired nothingness.  This is why I choose to let my …

General Rules of Fashion: Part 2

Today we will complete the general rules of fashion and advice that are truly timeless for women of any century.  Hope you enjoy! Style and form of dress Be always careful when making up the various parts of your wardrobe, that each article fits you accurately. Not in the outside garments alone must this rule be followed, an ill-fitting pair of corsets, or wrinkles in any other article of the under-clothes, will make a dress set badly, even if it has been itself fitted with the utmost accuracy. A stocking which is too large, will make the boot uncomfortably tight, and too small will compress the foot, making the shoe loose and untidy. In a dress, no outlay upon the material will compensate for a badly fitting garment. A cheap calico made to fit the form accurately and easily, will give the wearer a more lady-like air than the richest silk which either wrinkles or is too tightly strained over the figure. Collars or sleeves, pinned over or tightly strained to meet, will entirely mar …