All posts tagged: 1860’s gown

On My Inspiration Board: Coral Gowns

Happy Thanksgiving week everyone!!   I can’t believe we are already at Thanksgiving!  While I feel that the summer went by at a normal pace, this fall has simply flew!! I have been very busy sewing these past days, not only getting ready for Black Friday and Cyber Monday on my shop (click HERE to see all the deals), but also with some fun projects just for the heck of it!  One such project, was this 1810’s day gown in such a fun shade of coral-ly pink. Now I know, that like so many colors, what one person may think is coral may not be what another person would describe it as.  So if you are sitting at home thinking that none of the gowns in this post are coral…that’s okay!  Agree to disagree! 🙂  Regardless, something about this happy color just sent me on a coral-hunting mission, and while there are not very many historical examples out there in coral, there are a few! Lets start with this lovely painting called La Jeune Musicienne created …

Historical Patterns I’m Excited to Try!

I think I have drained my current pool of patterns.  I mean, I love many of them and will always use them…but, I’m am definitely feeling a little bored.   Especially with my due date coming closer and closer, I am trying to stay occupied with sewing…it’s sort of working! 🙂 So yesterday, with the warm sun on my face, I spent a little time looking up some new and different patterns to try.  Here are a few of my favorites!!!   Links to the patterns are below each image! I love the unique and various caps in this particular pattern.  Especially the Round Eared Cap with double ruffle!! 1740-1820 Women and Girls Caps from Amazon Dry Goods I am sure anyone wearing this amazingly beautiful, pleated mantle would feel elegant and very summery!  The only thing I’m not sure of is what fabric I would use….. 1863 Summer Mantle from Amazon Dry Goods With a yardage requirement of 16 yards, this gown would definitely be a commitment, but I love all the ruffles and …

On My Inspiration Board: Patterned Gowns

I decided to bring back an old post favorite which I haven’t done in a while: On My Inspiration Board!  For this post, I choose either a color, pattern, shape, or type of gown and collect my favorites to share from the years 1800-1950.  For today’s version, I decided to choose gowns made out a of patterned fabric.  Whether geometric, floral, or striped, these gowns are wonderful examples of fabric design and gown creation! In my daily wardrobe, I don’t really wear a whole lot of patterns.  Yet when it comes to my sewing, I adore using patterns.  Any type of pattern using any type of colors.  I simply love it.  And based on all my research, I am not alone!  From morning gowns, to tea gowns, to evening gowns, patterns have been a favorite for decades. This particular painting shows how embroidery create a lovely pattern on this elegant 1810’s court dress.  Perhaps not a gown to be worn by the average woman, bust still stunning! Duchess Talleyrand-Périgord, Princess Dorothea by Joseph Chabord This gown …

Piping – Is it Needed?

It’s confession time. I have not always used nor understood the point of piping.  I didn’t get it.  I didn’t know when to use it, and I was pretty sure it was a waste of my time. And then, I got a bit better at my sewing.  So I stopped using excuses as to why I didn’t pipe and finally acknowledged that it was because I didn’t know how to use it at all. Piping, in this context, refers to a 1 1/2″-2″ wide strip of fabric, cut on the bias, which has then been folded in half with a piece of cording place in between.  A tight stitch along the side of the cording creates a smooth finish.  This piping is then used in various places on bodices, and occasionally skirts, to add strength, texture, and contrast.  The tricky part is you have to keep your stitches tight. I mean tight.  You just want to see the cording peeping through in a neat and tidy fashion.  And this is where I would become frustrated and …

Fashion Plate Fun

Today I thought it would be fun to browse through a variety of fashion plates!  I mean, who doesn’t love a little gown envy?!   I decided to share a few of my favorites starting around 1830 and going up to 1940.  Ranging from daywear to evening wear, these fashion plates are just the thing to get your fashion juices flowing!   Let’s get started! This 1830’s evening gown is in the most amazing color of blue I have ever seen!   These 1850’s gowns are perfect examples of visiting or afternoon gowns. While it is a toss up between the two, I am in love with the yellow 1860’s ballgown with red floral accents. While I am sure walking was very difficult in this particular creation, I still love the color and pattern combinations of this 1880’s gown. A lovely array of turn of the century shirtwaists.   Sigh….I adore every single one of these 1910’s outfits.   Perfect for summer vacations, these 1920’s outfits are just made for an ocean resort. This soft …

A Regency Era Photoshoot

What do you get when you take two friends, a plethora of historical gowns, and two large Pumpkin Spice Lattes?  A wonderfully fun time with some fabulous pictures to prove it!  A few weeks ago I decided that I wanted to photograph a large portion of my historical gown stock using real life models.  So armed with a fully charged camera, my friend Cassandra and I braved the rainy and slightly chilly elements over the past two weekends to photograph some really stunning images!  And since there are so many pictures to see, I will just get right to it!!   I hope you enjoy!!! Oh and one last picture of Cassandra discovering the most perfect fall leaf of all….lovingly named “Leif Erikson” All of these gowns are available on my Etsy Shop! I hope you enjoyed these photos as they were an absolute delight to take! Have a fabulous Monday!!    

Three Unusual Portraits

Sometimes, on my researching adventures, I come across paintings or photographs of individuals that stop my wandering eyes in an instant.  Whether it is something about their pose, or their outfit, or the fact that I feel like I can connect with their personality, images like the ones in today’s post just fascinate me.   This first one features the wonderful giggliness of a young girl from the 1850’s! What a sweetheart!!!  And a wonderful example of children’s fashion.   This next painting I found to be a fantastic example of late 1700’s styling and fashion.  The smile, the gown, THAT HAT….its all absolutely beautiful! Portrait Of E. N. Arsenyeva By Vladimir Borovikovsky, 1796 This last portrait (c. 1860) caught my eye as the riding gown this woman is wearing has the most amazing placement of tucks.  I can just envision her riding a horse with that long, flowy skirt fluttering behind her! Such beautiful examples of fashion, creativity, and personality! I see images of individuals from various time periods everyday…hundreds of pictures, drawings, paintings….and yet, only a few cause …

The Gowns that have Inspired My Sewing…

I have been sewing since I was a little girl and dabbled in the usual assortment of projects that new sewers try.  A few handbags, a dress or two, and perhaps a little quilting.  But there comes a time in every sewer’s journey when they begin to discover their particular niche.  While they still may sew a variety of things, they often find one particular style, or area, or system that is their most favorite.  And that is the beautiful thing about sewing.  Sewing is one of those rare hobbies that can be truly for enjoyment while still offering a wonderful service.  It will always be a needed talent and one that should be carefully and lovingly cultivated. I went on my own little journey of sewing during my summer vacations of college.  This was of course in the days before Pinterest and my access to historical fashion was limited, but I was able to Google a lot of the various images.  Through this process, I began finding gowns that spoke to me and continue to inspire …