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Regency Chemisette Video Tutorial

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I am so excited about today’s post as it has been a long time in coming! 

Using inspiration from a variety of sources, I have created a video tutorial and pattern on how to create a Regency Era Chemisette custom designed to fit you!  Simply open up the PDF pattern, follow the guidelines on how to create the pattern pieces, then watch the videos below to  learn how to create your very own chemisette.  

Tutorial will help you create a chemisette with one or two ruffles (as pictured in images below.)

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(Image from Janet Arnold’s Patterns of Fashion I)

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(Painting of 1800 Empress Elizabeth Alexeievna, artist unknown)

REGENCY CHEMISETTE VIDEO TUTORIAL

Click the underlined link below to open up PDF pattern.

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***Videos show how to create a two ruffle chemisette.  If desired, simply cut out two ruffles using measurements presented in pattern****

Part One

In this video section, I will show you how to construct the frame of the chemisette and create the neckline darts.

Part Two

In this section we will stitch darts, sew cording/ribbon channels, and begin to work on the ruffle.

Part Three

This portion will show you how to pleat the ruffle.  

Part Four

Now that the ruffle is pleated, this part will show you how to create the ruffled neckline in order to attach it to the chemisette.

Part Five

This last video details attaching the ruffle to the neckline and completing all the finishing touches.

And that’s it!  

Feel free to play around and create various styles and necklines of chemisettes!  

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And as always, feel free to share a picture of your own creation on social media!  

  Simply post on my Facebook page or use the tag #aimeevictorian on Instagram.  Links to both platforms are on the sidebar of my blog!

Happy Sewing!

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Cover Painting

By Pierre Louis Bouvier GENEVA 1766 – 1836

Sources Used:

Janet Arnold Patterns of Fashion 1

Various of paintings from 1805-1015

Vintage rooms I would love to visit….

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Sometimes I wish I could redo some room in my house in historical theme and then switch it back when I was through.  Unfortunately I have neither the time, energy, or money to accomplish such a task.  Therefore, I am left to dream about the fun of experiencing and living in various rooms from various time periods…without spending a dime.

Here are a few of my favorite vintage rooms I would just love to spend a week living in!

While I would never go so aggressive with one color in my bedroom today, I would love to try it out!  And this 1940’s purple inspired room would be so fun!

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This 1950’s kitchen is so homey and inviting.  I can already smell the apple pie cooking!

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I would absolutely love to having a living room just like the Ricardo’s second apartment…love the curtains!

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This 1950’s living room would be a wonderful place to read, chat, or take a nap!

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Equally as lovely is this 1940’s sitting room! 

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And who wouldn’t love to sip an ice cold glass of lemonade on a veranda such as this 1950’s example?!

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Even if I can’t create and visit rooms like this today, I can still appreciate their charm and appeal!!

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A Look at “Simple” Pottery for the Table

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Very few of us today use fancy china more than one or two times a year.  I, unfortunately, fall into that category and find that I much prefer to use my everyday “heartier” dishes.  While this may be the case with many of us today, it is fun to look back and notice that this wasn’t always the case.  Around the late 1880’s using china on a daily basis was the norm, however there began to be a switch around the 1920’s to embracing more humble forms of pottery for the more simpler meals of the day. For example, the following excerpt describes the appropriate times and locations to use more simple pottery.

“A third class of tableware is “pottery.”  It is , as a rule, the least carefully, and therefore the least expensively, made tableware…We speak of the simple “tea-room” variety, gay in color and elemental as to decorate, such as all are familiar with.  Some of our readers may have collected pieces of such pottery when traveling in various parts of the world and know that it is the type of earthenware used by peasants, and for this reason the simple designs are often called “peasant patterns.”  Peasant patterns are seen on earthenware also, and because appropriate for use in the simplest homes called also “cottage” patterns.  If the house or apartment is as simple as the pottery (it may be so and yet beautiful) then you may use this ware for breakfast, lunch and dinner.  In some homes, pottery is appropriate for breakfast and lunch and tea, but the dinner table may call for more formal china.”

 – excerpt from Be Your Own Decorator by Emily Burbank, 1922

When I read this, I imagine two different types of pottery.  One earthy, rustic, and displayed on a shelf like this:

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Image from deja-vu

And the other, bright, bold and simple!

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See current samples of Cornish Ware.

Regardless of which way you envision these “cottage” dishes, I love the idea that they have their place in the realm of tableware.  That just because they are “simple” it doesn’t mean they are any less special at meal time.

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Cover Photo by New Home Interior Design

Winter Outfits: 1870-1940

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Another cold snap has hit and brought with it a foot of snow!  I can’t really complain as I love the snow, but it certainly does require quite a bit of bundling up.  On days like this, I pull out my faithful down coat and matching snow boots, suit up, and then head out to brace the winter wind. Of course, I promise myself if I can complete all my errands without too much resentment towards the bitter cold, then I can have a nice hot cup of cocoa when I come home…its a great compromise!

So despite the chill outside, today’s post is all about warm and stylish winter clothing!  To start with, I found this fascinating timeline on gdfalksen.com.  I absolutely love the purple tones and enjoy seeing the change of fashion.

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Image by gdfalksen.com

And out of all these lovely looks, I found some extras that I just had to include!

Here are two 1880’s ensemble, with one featuring a lovely face veil.

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This 1918 look has a lovely matching fur collar and muff…and those pleat/skirt drapings are to die for!

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Another lovely collection of 1910’s winter wear…the brown coat ensemble in the foreground is my favorite.

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Stylish and sporty describe this 1930’s winter look!  I love how, despite the activity,  her hat is perfectly perched on her well coifed hair.

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This adorable duo, also from the 1930’s, are displaying to very different, yet very attractive winter coats!

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A true hallmark of the 1940’s period, this winter look is clean, simple, and adorably functional!

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Bundle up everyone!  It’s going to be a cold one today! 🙂

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A 1770’s Fashion Shoot

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What better way to start off the new year than with a historical fashion shoot!  This particular shoot highlighted two new 1770’s gown I created last month.  Which was a miracle I was able to get any sewing done, since I spent quite a few weeks hugging the toilet….I’m four months pregnant just in case you missed last week’s post! 🙂

Anyways!!!  I am so happy to be feeling better and what better way to celebrate than with a wonderful snowy day and some wonderful photographs. So with a big thank you to my model Cassandra, here are a few of my favorite images from this fun photo adventure!

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Both gown are currently for sale on my Etsy Shop along with many new Regency custom order listings!  

Well, now I’m going to grab a snack and go work on a 1916 skirt….fingers crossed!! 

Have a fabulous Wednesday everyone!

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A 2016 Year End Review

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Well, we have made it to the end of 2016 and, boy, what a year!  Many highs, a few lows, and one big life change would sum up my past 12 months.  While I haven’t been able to post as much as I would like over the past few weeks, I plan on getting right back on track for the new year!

One of my most favorite posts to do at this time of year is the review of my favorite sewing projects.  I love looking back and seeing all the various creations I have made, and hopefully I will be able to notice a few improvements on my technique as well! 

So let’s take a look at a few of my favorite projects from this year!!

I loved creating this 1943 ruffled blouse!  Click this link to see how to make one of your own!

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This 1930’s beach wrap was created from scrap fabric which I got for $1 a yard!!  Love those kinds of savings!

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One major accomplishment this year was the publication of my very own vintage sewing pattern book!  Click HERE for more information!

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I designed this 1940’s salmon pink suit by taking inspiration from three separate designs!

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I returned to my roots, and began sewing Regency era gowns again and had great fun photographing them out in nature!

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…and in lovely historic settings.

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Now that my life has return to a more normal status, I can’t wait to get back into my sewing room and starting whipping up more creations!  My 2017 plans include some 1700’s clothing, 1910’s, and everything in between! 🙂

I wish you all a very happy and healthy end to 2016 and beginning of 2017!  

Cheers!!!!

Oh and that big life change I mentioned earlier???….it will be making it’s sweet debut June 2017!! 🙂

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My Christmas Gift Giving Guide

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Well, the days before Christmas are beginning to dwindle down, but if you are looking for that last minute gift for friend, a family member, or yourself, I have five fantastic options!!

 

Vintage Gold Sewing Prints by Mod Pop Deco– $15 + 

I love these prints by Mod Pop Deco!  They are elegant and can easily go in a sewing room or a bedroom.

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ModPop Deco

 

Monthly Sewing box by Stitch Box Monthly  – $30 for one month

With a different box each month, this fun little gift is a welcome surprise for anyone after the holidays.  Each box comes with fabric, tools, a pattern, and variety of other items.  A great present for that sewer who has everything!

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Stitch Box Monthly 

 

12 Days Advent Calendar from The Vintage Cosmetic Company – $42

This is a wonderful idea for the person who can’t simply wait for Christmas to get here!  With a little surprise each day, any makeup lover will adore this advent calendar.

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The Vintage Cosmetic Company 

 

Bath Fizzies from Les Belles Bouclettes – $3 for 10 pcs.

With all the stress of the holiday season, nothing would feel better than a warm and fizzy bubble bath.  And these lovelies from the ladies at Les Belles Bouclettes are perfect for a friend, neighbor, or (with such a great price) a few for yourself!  Try them in their new scents of Olivia (chocolate mocha) or Citrus Splash…yum!

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Les Belles Bouclettes

 

Instant Downloadable Print for a 1940’s/1950’s Capelet by Aimee’s Victorian Armoire – $7.50

Perfect for the beginner who is looking to break into the skill of pattern drafting, this pattern, created by me, is perfect for those chilly days…or create one in a lighter fabric in preparation for spring!

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Aimee’s Victorian Armoire

So have fun crossing off those final names on your gift giving list, and celebrate with a cup of hot chocolate…and a warm fuzzy bubble bath! 🙂

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An Excerpt from The Magic of Dress, 1911

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With the upcoming holidays, many of us will be attending many festive parties!  With that in mind, here is an excerpt from The Magic of Dress by Grace Margaret Gould written in 1911!

“With the evening comes more elaborate dress.  The fashionable woman needs dinner gowns, theater and opera gowns and ball costumes.  The more cultivated she is, the more she make the art of the dress the study it should be, the finer and more appropriate are the distinctions between these attires.  

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In planning them she must first have a definite idea of the prevailing mode as to fabric and outline.  Then, if she is wise, she will modify the present style to her own type; and whether she is planning one gown or a dozen gowns, let each be distinctive and each suit the occasion on which it is to be worn.  

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It is well to bear in mind that the trimming of a gown may give a distinctive touch to it, and that in a measure it acts as an index to the dress, putting the gown in its own class.  Never use the same type of trimming on your evening gowns.  If the dancing frock is trimmed with artificial flowers of chiffon and satin, have the ball gown trimmed with fur, or gold or silver embroideries. A woman with one trimming is a woman of one-dress idea, and not much of an idea at that.

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It goes without saying that a little good trimming is better than a lot of inferior trimming.  When economy must be given at least a passing thought, a good quality of velvet or brocade is a better investment than some prevailing fad in silks or even some exquisite shade of chiffon.  There is always the next year to bear in mind.”

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