1940’s Hat Tutorial

Well, this just happens to be the easiest hat to make ever!  

If you can sew in a circle, you can make this hat.  The inspiration for this little accessory came from the movie Best Foot Forward (1943) staring Lucille Ball.

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I loved the sheer elegance of this hat along with the delicate way it perches on the head.

Want to make one of your own?

All you need is a cut-out template of desired shape (mine was a 10″ x 11″ oval cut out of heavy paper) and 5 yards of tulle.

  1. Simply cut out as many ovals as you wish.  The more ovals, the more full the hat.  I folded the tulle several times to save time on cutting.
  2. Pin a smaller oval in the center and then stitch through all the layers.  You will see that my circle is slightly shifted to the back of the head so it would be fuller by my face.
  3. I then made two rows of stitches, one right on top of the other, to ensure a secure hold.

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That’s it!  Simply pin on your head and enjoy!

Here are a few more closeups, along with some shots of the whole ensemble!  To see the post on the creation and inspiration of the suit, please click here.

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1940's suit with hat 6

1940's suit collage

Have a fabulous Monday my friends!

~Aimee


A 1930’s Accessory in Ten Minutes or Less…

Looking for the perfect accessory to go with that 1930’s outfit?  Why, yes you are!

Have 10 inches of the perfect fabric?  As a matter of fact, yes!

Have ten minutes to spare?  Of course!

Then this little scarf is for you!

 Add another 20 minutes and you can also whip up the flower pin…look for the link to the tutorial below.

Supplies:

2 pieces of fabric cut to 10″ x 32″….or however long you would like the scarf.

Process:

1. Slightly round the edges of the scarf.

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2. Then stitch right sides together, leaving an opening to turn the scarf right side out.

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3. Turn scarf right side out, then pin the opening closed.

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4. Whipstitch closed.  This side will be the “bottom” of the scarf.

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5. Figure out where you would like the scarf to be gathered, and run a long gathering stitch from one side to the other.

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6. Gather and secure in place with a few stitches on the backside.

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7. Repeat with both sides.

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Pin around neck and add any decoration you would like!

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Add your own Flower Pin for an extra bit of elegant fun!

Happy accessorizing!

~Aimee


Who’s Ahead – Vacation Clothes

It is a warm summer evening and anyone who is anyone is mingling down by the bandstand.  You know, the one in the center of town that has a lovingly placed plaque dating it to some bygone era, where the once crisp white paint is starting to chip and show signs of one too many harsh winters.  The reason for the gathering is clear: the town orchestra is playing a summer concert of past favorites, a few marches, and one or two sing-alongs for the whole crowd to join.  It happens every year and is looked forward to with eager and earnest anticipation by old and young alike.  It has become even more popular to tote along a packed picnic basket of those delightful treats that are musts for outdoor eating.  Cold cut sandwiches, hot dogs, thermoses of hot or cold soup, numerous types of potato salads, and mugs teeming with ice and refreshing lemonade: a feast for all.

As the wrist and pocket watches indicate the start of the show along with the customary squeak and groan of string and woodwind instruments warming up, parents hustle their children to the family blankets while grandparents nestle into their sturdy folding chairs.  All are dressed in proper flat footwear, shorts or capri pants along with cardigans and jackets located nearby to ward off the encroaching night air.  The conductor bows and starts the group off with a crowd favorite when you notice a nearby tourist struggling.  She is wearing a lovely sleeveless blouse, a flowy long skirt, and beautiful, yet very skinny high heels.  She seems rather chilly as she walks precariously to an empty park bench, heels sinking into the soft grass, and mentally bemoaning the inevitable mud kicking up to the hem of her skirt.  If only she had brought her sweater and a pair of flats….then she too could be swaying gently to the music and not from severe cold chills and lack of proper footing.

I have been that woman too many times to count and have firmly learned the invaluable lesson to dress for the event….not just for my personal taste! 🙂

Here are a few more dressing for location tips from a 1949 Good Housekeeping article entitled “Who’s Ahead”

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Who's Ahead 2

Plan well for those vacations my friends and always be “ahead!”

~Aimee

Source: Good Housekeeping, Volume 129, July 1949


Accessories: 1950’s Tulip Capelet

I came across a picture of this adorable little cape in a 1950’s sewing magazine a few weeks ago and simply fell in love.  I knew I wished to recreate this look and was very pleased at how easy and quick this was to put together.  From start to finish (including cut out time) it took just under an hour and with some pressing, this little capelet is the perfect cover for any 1950’s summer dress!

Supplies:

1  1/2 -2 yards of fabric (depends on width of fabric)

Pattern:  1 square equals 1 inch

Tulip Capelet Pattern

You will also need to cut out one 36″ x 2″ strip for the tie that goes into the casing around the neck.

Process:

1. Stitch together all ten pieces of the capelet, right sides together, but make sure not to stitch into a circle.  Repeat with lining pieces.

Place the two pieces right sides together and pin.

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2.  Stitch around all outer edges, but leave the front seams open.  You will whipstitch these closed later.

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3.  Turn right side out and press.

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4.  Pin the location for the casing and stitch.  You can also turn under the front seams, pin, and whipstitch.

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Stitch the ties, turn right side out, press, and then insert through the casing.

I was also honored to be interviewed by Jessica from Chronically Vintage.  Please visit her amazing sight to check out not only my answers but her  as well!

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1930’s Inspired Scarf Tutorials

A toss here, a gentle tug there and any outfit can go from simply thrown together to a complete ensemble.  But what is this magic piece of the puzzle?  A scarf, of course!  One of the long standing pieces in a woman’s closet, scarves can offer a multitude of styles for a very reasonable price.

Here are a few tutorials I put together for the vintage loving female!  Based off of 1930’s looks, I hope they add to your wardrobe creations both modern and historical!

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scarf 2

scarf 3

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Enjoy and play away!!

~Aimee


Accessories: 1930’s Sheer Capelet Tutorial

A few weeks ago, I watched one of my favorite Ginger Rogers’ movie Bachelor Mother and could not stop drooling over her wardrobe.  One article of clothing struck me in particular, which led to several late nights in my sewing studio trying to perfect the pattern.  What was this piece that threw me into a tizzy?  A small, collared capelet which adds such an air of grace and femininity to even the simplest of frocks.  Although I made mine of a very sheer fabric, the fabric choice is really up to you.  The key is to drape the capelet over your dress form when you pin the shoulder darts.

Supplies:

  • 1 yard of choice fabric
  • Thread

The Pattern

Use the following guide to cut out your pattern pieces.  Adjust for your personal body size as needed.

graph pattern

The Steps

Create a French seam down the center back of the capelet.

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I added a collar to my capelet.  If you do not wish to have one, simply hand sew the neck edges and attach the ties as normal after you sew the shoulder seams.  If you are using a collar, make sure to test on your dress form to ensure a good drape.

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Accessories: 1940’s Hair Turban

In keeping with the theme of spring cleaning, this little tutorial will be sure to keep you hairdo dust free!

While there are many ways to create the adorable 1940’s hair turban, I wanted to create something a little different.  My turban has extra long ties to create a bow on top of the head, while a hammock like piece wraps around the head to keep your hair tucked away.

*** The size of the rectangle can be altered according to head size and hair length.  Some bobby pinning may be required to achieve a secure fit.

Here is what you will need:

– 1/2 yard of cotton fabric

– Thread

Lay out your fabric and create shapes with the following measurements.  Cut out.  Cut two ties out of the 6″ wide section (3″ wide.)  You can make the ties as wide as you like.  For a more fluffy bow, try ties that are 5-6 ” wide.

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Then hem the long sides of the rectangle.

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Run a gathering stitch along the shorter sides.

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Now take the ties, fold them right sides together, stitch, turn out and press.DSC_0064

Gather up the shorter sides to the length of the ties and pin.  Stitch right sides together.

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Trim excess fabric and press.

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And there you have a unique 1940’s inspired turban!

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Enjoy!!

~ Aimee


1920’s House Apron

If you have an urge to use up some of your fabric stash, or simply have an hour to spare for some much needed crafting time, try this easy tutorial to make a charming slip-over apron.  Based on an 1926 pattern, this adorable apron features a scooped front, slightly gathered back, and two fabric ties.

Supplies:

1 yard (36″ wide) of cotton fabric

5 yards of bias tape

Optional: rickrack

Tools:

Paper or spare fabric to make pattern

ruler and marker

Scissors and pins

Sewing Machine

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